Easy to buy

When you’re building something to solve peoples problems, it can be tempting to build feature after feature and try to sell them all to the customers at the same time.

What often happens is that it can be hard to get the customer engaged in a dialogue or a trial – simply because you’re overwhelming them with information about features, solutions etc that they have a hard time figuring out whether your product is actually a potential solution to the key problem you have.

As an alternative, you could start smaller. Start by telling about one thing that matters to a customer segment, who you know is experiencing the problem. Use that as a way of engaging in a dialogue or a trial, from which you can build from, upsell and secure an ongoing relationship to a future happy customers.

Start small. Be easy to buy. And then take it from there.

(Photo by Andrew Ling on Unsplash)

The crisis test

Do customers flood you with support calls when your service is down? Or is it more or less quiet?

If it’s the latter, you have a problem. Because then all indications are that your product doesn’t really mean much to your customers; they can easily do without it. Maybe they don’t even realize it’s not there anymore.

If on the other hand it’s the first, congratulations. Not on having issues but in having created something important enough for customers to register when it’s not there anymore and even complain about.

It is probably one of the best indications that you have achieved Product-Market Fit.

Of course you can’t rest on the laurels when you’re in a situation, where you product is not performing as it should. But while your struggling to get it back up and working again at least take some comfort from the fact that you have achieved something:

You have created something that matters to someone outside your immediate circle of family and friends.

Congratulations.

And now get it back up and working again.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

In da (Club)house

Until yesterday I hadn’t been ‘fortunate’ enough to be invited to Clubhouse yet. But until the invite came, I could see some people complaining that there isn’t a ‘Listen later’ feature in the product, and how odd it is.

Actually, I think it’s borderline brilliant.

One of the big challenges of everything digital is that we have lost the need to be present when something happens.

We can always catch up later.

Few of us actually make an effort to do that, but we’re all guilty of not really being present in the moment for that reason alone – that we can always catch up later.

I think that is a big issue. On an almost existential level.

For that reason I love the idea of a service where you need to be there, when it happens – or miss out completely. I love the idea of forcing people to prioritize to be present to get something for themselves.

I think we need that. As humans. To be forced to stop, take pause, listen and engage. Live. And then go about our other business.

If Clubhouse can help a move towards that scenario, I am all for it.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

Arghh, it’s good enough

“They will love it, when they see it. And they will realize that this is just what they have been waiting for.”

Trying to build something for a market that’s nascent is super hard on so many levels. Yet, it is also one of those areas where time and time again, I meet founders who seem determined that their novel idea is going to take the world with storm, once they unleash it.

It is almost as if the future customers have just been waiting for this new breakthrough. Without knowing it of course.

Reality is it seldom happens that way.

Breaking into a new market let alone creating a new market and a demand in it is super, super hard. And founders who think it’s just a matter of making the technology work are doing themselves and their chances for success a big disservice.

Because what you’re up against is the most dreaded practical barrier of them all:

Good enough.

While they may not be using the optimal solution today, maybe what they have just works for their needs.

Maybe they have become so accustomed to nothing happening in this particular space, that they have stopped looking or even hoping for something better.

Maybe their habits are just so engrained in them that the very thought of doing something in a novel way is somewhat frightening.

The point is that there could be a lot of reasons but that the end result is the same – for the time being:

What I have is good enough.

Overcoming that dreaded barrier is not only a question about making technology work. It is also – and perhaps to some extend more – about packaging it right, getting the message right and getting it out there in front of future customers using the right channels at the right time.

And so much more.

The real important lesson here is that although the opportunity can seem huge, and there seems to be a big void in the market for something new, getting something new going in that void is going to take skill, experience, muscle (aka money) – and some degree of luck.

Don’t ever underestimate that job.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

Corona thoughts, part 5

Jeffrey Katzenbergs new mobile streaming service meant for the commute, Quibi, has finally launched. And is getting killed by the reviewers. You can be excused for thinking that the timing couldn’t be worse when no-one is commuting right now, but in general the service seems to be a product looking for a problem, where there is none.

The fate of Quibi might suggest that now is the time for ‘The Great Sanity Check‘; the time where you look hard at what you do and use the opportunity to really ask yourself the hard question: All fanfare forgotten, does what I am trying to build really make any sense at all?

Can you see a path to a real business? Or – perhaps better yet – can you see an accelerated path to becoming a real business utilizing what you now know from the corona outbreak as things to factor into your plan? Can you adjust to life post-corona and come out on top? It is worth spending some serious time thinking about because in all probability it is going to be your reality, whether you want it or not.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

Problems persist

If you are trying to solve a problem that your customers emphatize with but are NOT actively looking to solve right now, does that indicate that maybe the problem is not that big after all?

Conventional wisdom will say that it is definitaly a possibility. But take a step back and consider another thing:

When a user is not actively looking for a solution to a big problem, it is not that the problem isn’t real. It could instead be that the user, in the absence of obvious solutions, have plain and simple given up for now. And that they are just waiting to discover your solution.

Problems tend to persist. Even if we have (momentarily) given up on solving them.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

When tech matters

Having worked with technology and product development for close to 20 years, I have never considered myself someone who was fascinated by technology for technologys own sake. Rather I have been – and continue to be – fascinated by what kind of problems technology can help solve.

Case in point: New search seems to indicate that in a not too distant future, Amazons Alexa can predict a lot of cases of cardiac arrests by listening in on your breathing patterns potentially saving thousands of lives in the process by triggering an emergency call and making sure that help arrives in time.

It is a huge win, if it somes to market. Of course there are all the usual caveats about privacy, surveillance and such, but if the promise is that a device can potentially save your life, is that a tradeoff you as a customer is willing to make? My bet is that it will be for a lot of people. Because this kind of appliance of technology truly matters in the deepest most personal sense of the word.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

Go talk to a customer

One of the things that continues to amaze me is the power of actually seeking out potential customers for solving a problem and chat to them about their experiences so far in both experiencing the problem and trying to find solutions for it.

It is easy to get an idea all by yourself. But the idea – or better yet; the theme in which your idea resides – gets so much extra power by actually meeting and listening to the real experts: Those experiencing the problem.

The exercise itself is really simple: Figure out who you need to meet, set up some meetings or chats for coffee etc, show up, ask a few questions and LISTEN. I guarantee you will leave much smarter. And you will be able to channel all that insight directly into whatever it is that you’re doing, if you choose to. And yes; you should.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)