Make it simple to buy

Are you unwillingly driving customers away from you by having a complex, ‘inside out’ business model? You should definitely check.

If you do, you should do your utmost to align your business model with how your customers are running their business and make an effort to just slide right in as the perfect solution to whatever pain, they’re experiencing.

The above dawned on me recently when I had a conversation with some great startup people about their business, their business model and their pricing strategy. While everything they said made perfect sense from their point-of-view, I realized something:

Every time their product was presented to a potential customer, the customer essentially had to first understand the startups preferred way of doing business before making an assessment as to whether their way of doing business and the product would make sense to get into their own business.

This seemed strange for a couple of reasons:

First, we know that the market is hugely competitive, and that complexity has the potential to kill any deal, if there is a simple alternative just there for the taking.

Second, we know that closing a sale means reducing the steps and reasons to say ‘No’ to a bare minimum. Whenever you introduce any kind of friction, you’re essentially adding potential opportunities for your future customer to just say ‘No’ to whatever it is, you’re offering.

So what to do instead?

Make an effort to understand your potential customers, how they do business, and what the challenges and pains are that your product could easily help them overcome. And then package your product in such a way that you’re the obvious solution for them to say ‘Yes’ to – every single time it’s presented to them.

There is really no excuse for making buying your product too complicated for customers.

(Photo by Ibrahim Boran on Unsplash)

Bad market feedback

One of the hardest things for many startups is dealing with bad market feedback; the sense that what you have been trying to bring to the world just isn’t being that well received at all.

It is the flipside of doing market testing and validation. While obviously the right thing to do, we always go into a test in the hope that results will be good and support our hypothesis. Yet, many times it just won’t happen.

What to do then?

Obviously the answer is not not to do any testing. That’s just stupid; it won’t make the bad feedback go away – it will just present itself way later when you have put a lot more energy and ressources into a product that ultimately might be failing.

The answer of course is to (1) learn to deal with bad market feedback and (2) think about how you deal with particular feedback based on what it is that you’re testing.

The best way to deal with bad market feedback is to remember that the market and the customers are always right. If you get bad feedback it is a sign that something in what you’re doing is off; the wrong approach, the wrong customer segment, maybe even the wrong product.

You get the feedback, internalize it, redo and come back much stronger. And you understand and accept that there are no points for insisting you’re right and the market is wrong. None.

On the second point, you can grade how you do testing and work with bad market feedback. While it of course sucks to get very bad feedback for your product as such, getting bad market feedback for an outlier idea or approach is actually really, really valuable.

Let’s assume that you have been playing with an idea of getting a sub-set of your feature set earlier to market in order to start generating revenue. It’s not entirely ‘on strategy’ when you look at your vision, but you want to start generating revenue as soon as possible.

Should you do that? Or should you stay the original course?

Test it.

If you get bad market feedback from testing that outlier approach, you will have learned that (a) clearly your idea is not going to be a runaway hit and (b) maybe the opportunity you saw to get an early product out and essentially diversify is a bad one and will only take away focus and ressources from your main effort. If that is the case, you will be happy that the bad market feedback has helped you and your team dodge a future bullet.

So, in summary, bad market feedback can be extremely good and valuable feedback, as it can help you focus on what’s really important and utilize your ressources in the best possible way. So make sure you don’t get distracted on a personal level and take it in as a defeat that leaves you stuck in f***.

It’s not.

(Photo by Jon Tyson on Unsplash)

Easy to buy

When you’re building something to solve peoples problems, it can be tempting to build feature after feature and try to sell them all to the customers at the same time.

What often happens is that it can be hard to get the customer engaged in a dialogue or a trial – simply because you’re overwhelming them with information about features, solutions etc that they have a hard time figuring out whether your product is actually a potential solution to the key problem you have.

As an alternative, you could start smaller. Start by telling about one thing that matters to a customer segment, who you know is experiencing the problem. Use that as a way of engaging in a dialogue or a trial, from which you can build from, upsell and secure an ongoing relationship to a future happy customers.

Start small. Be easy to buy. And then take it from there.

(Photo by Andrew Ling on Unsplash)

The crisis test

Do customers flood you with support calls when your service is down? Or is it more or less quiet?

If it’s the latter, you have a problem. Because then all indications are that your product doesn’t really mean much to your customers; they can easily do without it. Maybe they don’t even realize it’s not there anymore.

If on the other hand it’s the first, congratulations. Not on having issues but in having created something important enough for customers to register when it’s not there anymore and even complain about.

It is probably one of the best indications that you have achieved Product-Market Fit.

Of course you can’t rest on the laurels when you’re in a situation, where you product is not performing as it should. But while your struggling to get it back up and working again at least take some comfort from the fact that you have achieved something:

You have created something that matters to someone outside your immediate circle of family and friends.

Congratulations.

And now get it back up and working again.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

In da (Club)house

Until yesterday I hadn’t been ‘fortunate’ enough to be invited to Clubhouse yet. But until the invite came, I could see some people complaining that there isn’t a ‘Listen later’ feature in the product, and how odd it is.

Actually, I think it’s borderline brilliant.

One of the big challenges of everything digital is that we have lost the need to be present when something happens.

We can always catch up later.

Few of us actually make an effort to do that, but we’re all guilty of not really being present in the moment for that reason alone – that we can always catch up later.

I think that is a big issue. On an almost existential level.

For that reason I love the idea of a service where you need to be there, when it happens – or miss out completely. I love the idea of forcing people to prioritize to be present to get something for themselves.

I think we need that. As humans. To be forced to stop, take pause, listen and engage. Live. And then go about our other business.

If Clubhouse can help a move towards that scenario, I am all for it.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

Arghh, it’s good enough

“They will love it, when they see it. And they will realize that this is just what they have been waiting for.”

Trying to build something for a market that’s nascent is super hard on so many levels. Yet, it is also one of those areas where time and time again, I meet founders who seem determined that their novel idea is going to take the world with storm, once they unleash it.

It is almost as if the future customers have just been waiting for this new breakthrough. Without knowing it of course.

Reality is it seldom happens that way.

Breaking into a new market let alone creating a new market and a demand in it is super, super hard. And founders who think it’s just a matter of making the technology work are doing themselves and their chances for success a big disservice.

Because what you’re up against is the most dreaded practical barrier of them all:

Good enough.

While they may not be using the optimal solution today, maybe what they have just works for their needs.

Maybe they have become so accustomed to nothing happening in this particular space, that they have stopped looking or even hoping for something better.

Maybe their habits are just so engrained in them that the very thought of doing something in a novel way is somewhat frightening.

The point is that there could be a lot of reasons but that the end result is the same – for the time being:

What I have is good enough.

Overcoming that dreaded barrier is not only a question about making technology work. It is also – and perhaps to some extend more – about packaging it right, getting the message right and getting it out there in front of future customers using the right channels at the right time.

And so much more.

The real important lesson here is that although the opportunity can seem huge, and there seems to be a big void in the market for something new, getting something new going in that void is going to take skill, experience, muscle (aka money) – and some degree of luck.

Don’t ever underestimate that job.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

Corona thoughts, part 5

Jeffrey Katzenbergs new mobile streaming service meant for the commute, Quibi, has finally launched. And is getting killed by the reviewers. You can be excused for thinking that the timing couldn’t be worse when no-one is commuting right now, but in general the service seems to be a product looking for a problem, where there is none.

The fate of Quibi might suggest that now is the time for ‘The Great Sanity Check‘; the time where you look hard at what you do and use the opportunity to really ask yourself the hard question: All fanfare forgotten, does what I am trying to build really make any sense at all?

Can you see a path to a real business? Or – perhaps better yet – can you see an accelerated path to becoming a real business utilizing what you now know from the corona outbreak as things to factor into your plan? Can you adjust to life post-corona and come out on top? It is worth spending some serious time thinking about because in all probability it is going to be your reality, whether you want it or not.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

Problems persist

If you are trying to solve a problem that your customers emphatize with but are NOT actively looking to solve right now, does that indicate that maybe the problem is not that big after all?

Conventional wisdom will say that it is definitaly a possibility. But take a step back and consider another thing:

When a user is not actively looking for a solution to a big problem, it is not that the problem isn’t real. It could instead be that the user, in the absence of obvious solutions, have plain and simple given up for now. And that they are just waiting to discover your solution.

Problems tend to persist. Even if we have (momentarily) given up on solving them.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)