Blind purpose

Purpose is a great thing.

Until it kills you and/or your business.

I was reminded of this on LinkedIn when I read a holiday greeting from a former colleague in my feed. He works in a very troubled industry, have had a super challenging year but was none the less grateful to be working on something with great purpose.

It’s all very well. But the trend line is still pointing one way. Down.

If you are working to serve a higher purpose, your biggest obligation as an executive or any sort of employee with just a minimum of clout should be to ensure that you can keep doing what you’re doing – fulfilling your purpose.

If that takes a change in business model, fine. It that takes change(s) to the product(s), fine. If that changes working hard on developing your mental model and understanding what it is that enables you to ultimately do, what you are out to do, fine.

But, for the love of God, don’t just lean back and reflect on your purpose, while the house is on fire.

If you do, it will end up killing you.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

Circle kind of complete

One of the things, others can never take away from you is your past experience(s).

They are completely yours. Yours to cherish. Yours to curse. Yours to learn from. Yours to channel into something new.

I have often wondered why things happen. Why do you meet the people, you do? Why do you get the job offers you do? Why do you end up with the career, you do? Is it all part of a plan or does it just happen.

I am mostly in the latter camp. There is no connection between what I imagined myself doing 25 years ago and what I ended up doing and the places I went to work.

Until now.

Because as I am working hard to build a strong set of foundations for our new medtech startup, some of my past experiences are coming back into play. Experiences I didn’t know what I could use for back then, but where it has become blatantly obvious, how I can bring them to bear now.

I am not a big believer in anything except what I can see, hear, feel, taste and smell. But to the extend there is something more out there, I am enclined to say that right about now it is starting to dawn on me, why I did the things I did during my career;

Why I spent time working for the Danish Diabetes Foundation as my very first job fresh out of journalism school.

Why I spent time doing licensing and R&D deals for Microsoft Business Solutions.

Why I spent time in business management at Microsoft.

Why I spent a lot of time doing recruiting and getting both the team, roles and culture right at Berlingske Digital.

And so on. And so on.

The only thing I knew 25 years back – and before – was that one day I wanted to try to create something new that could benefit a lot of people.

Fast forward to today, and I am trying to follow up on that passion using the wealth of experiences, I gained over the years. I wouldn’t say the circle is being completed, but it sort of feels like that.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

A happy note

Yesterday, a long time acquintance sent me a direct Twitter-message that made me really happy.

In it he basically stated that it was great to observe from the sidelines the new things, I am involved in, and that to him it looked like, I had found a much better place for myself than was the case, when I was in the media industry.

Apart from agreeing 100 percent with his observation, what made me happy about it?

Basically that I am now doing what I love doing (and was perhaps meant to do all along?) in a way that is transparent and authentic to such an extend that it’s noticeable to the outside world. Not just from me telling about it but from the reflections of people-

It’s not that that is a goal in itself for me. It just reinforces my belief that I am on the right track and adds to my determination to carry on and keep pushing.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

Come on, lean in!

Yesterday I went for a summer get-together in my VL network group. Over a super nice summer meal, the discussion was flowing and we got talking about some of the things that you don’t normally find yourself talking about.

One of the discussions I was a part of was a discussion about what defines the opportunities we get in our professional lives. How did we become and do the things that we have become.

After some going back and forth, we agreed that what pretty much defined us had been the ability (and to some extend also luck, I guess) to invite ourselves to the party in crucial, defining moments:

Picking up on a sudden job opportunity presented by a promotion of a boss. Writing that unsolicited application. Sending the CEO an email after a meeting asking “Do you want more of this? I can offer you it”, etc.

Had we not done that our careers had not panned out the way they did (so far). It would have been vastly different. A lot of opportunities would never have been had, including opportunities to help create something meaningful and – in retrospect – perhaps even awesome.

It got me thinking.

How many of those I meet today are inviting themselves, taking charge of the conversation, having the ability and the guts to say “This is mine. I got this!”

Preciously few. Even with the opportunity presented right there in front of them, where it’s basically up for grabs.

Why is this important?

Because it is the people who are inviting themselves – who are leaning in across the table – that you really need on the team. It is those where you have got the feeling that if they continue to do that, chances are they will be awesome in the role. They will take ownership, take charge.

Because they care and really, really want it.

You want to be around people who really, really want it. It brings out not only the best in them but also the best in you.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)