Yay, it’s (almost) Christmas!

The Christmas holidays are upon us. and with that 2020 is (finally) coming to an end. It may thus be a good time to reflect a little on what went by in the year that passed.

Forget Covid-19 for a second (I’ll get back to that a bit later); for me this was a year about learning and reaffirmation.

When it comes to learning there are a number of approaches you can choose to take; everything from ‘trial and error’ to consciously looking to broaden your horizon. And while I have been doing some of both, I think my main take away has been to just insist that everything, I have been working on, is essentially a learning experience too – and reflect as I go along.

My personal experience is that that approach has made a huge personal difference to me. For me the difference has been between trying to make sense of things in hindsight to actually have an efficient structure for capturing learnings as we move along – an open mindset so to say with a great dedication to ensure that no matter what happened, I would get wiser from it.

Seen from that perspective I have learned a ton and become even more ‘battle-hardened’. I have learned about other people, trains of thought and processes, and I have learned a lot about how I handle them myself, so I don’t loose myself in the process. It may sound rather flimsy, but I can’t overestimate the value it has for me.

Did I accomplish all the things I set out to do? No. But did I learn a lot about why many of those things were exactly as hard and ambitious, as I predicted – and thus had a good feel for – before I moved ahead with them? Hell, yes.

And this brings me to the reaffirmation part of what 2020 taught me;

I have long had a feeling that I have a tendency to involve myself deep into complex projects that are super hard to pull off. Sometimes for reasons of breaking with the norms, adversity from my surroundings or something like that. Otherwise just for the sheer complexity of it.

I know full well that it might not always be the best thing to pursue for me as an individual – that it challenges me deeply on personal levels, where it shouldn’t. But what 2020 has given me is the insight that not only is it what usually tends to happen. I am also completely at peace with it.

I know now that when I miss out on something it’s usually not because I did a poor job or didn’t try hard enough. It is because the things, I – and people around me – try to pull off are super hard. And things that are super hard to pull off has a tendency to award you several setbacks along the way.

The magic trick is to accept that things are hard, not give up and just keep pushing, pushing and pushing until you make it work.

So that’s what I have been trying to do (and probably also why this upcoming holiday is pretty welcome at this point :-))

Other than that Covid-19 (there it was) has also played in on my sense of 2020 as the year of reaffirmation.

While others have (understandably) been hugely struck by all the limitations and changes to their preferred way of life, I have gotten reaffirmation that those things many others crave, I can still function well without.

It’s not that I hate other people. I don’t. Absolutely don’t. I just have a deep sense of confidence in my own company that I have enjoyed getting reaffirmed, because I believe it makes me stronger and more robust in terms of dealing with challenges of all sorts.

Having been through all sorts of personal crisis over the years, I have a deep sense for how I deal and cope with them, and getting that reaffirmed this year has been a source of strength and optimism in a year that could so easily have been low on both.

It has reaffirmed my core belief that no matter the challenge, there is always an opportunity that things may turn out well – as long as you don’t give up.

And with that, let’s look forward to 2021.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

Remember the rearview-mirror

It is so easy setting new goals that you can just as easily forget to follow up on the goals that came before them.

That is a real shame, because it is from actions past that you learn how to improve and getter better in the future. And with that also how you succeed in your new goals.

In essence one of your new goals should always be to follow up from your past activities and goals and use that as a way of informing what needs to be in the new goals, you set for yourself.

By doing that you will enable yourself to carry learnings from the past into future success. And you can’t get much more potent fuel for your ongoing success.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

The problem with OKR

I love OKR’s as a concept. And God knows I have been trying time and time again to make them and associated tracking apps and services work for me and my team.

But alas; I have failed every single time.

It is not that setting up OKRs is super hard; everybody can define and objective and a set of results to get to the objective. But sticking with it and having the discipline to work with it? That’s a whole different ball game.

For a startup context I think one of the reasons for this is that startup life is inherently messy; while you may have objectives, goals and other variations of KPIs (you should always have some of these) the journey towards them are never linear.

In practical terms what this means is that while you were addament you had it right, when you set your goals, they rarely survive when you fast forward to a future date. In fact, everything at this point in time might look substantially different.

I am fully aware that with OKR it is entirely possible to define your time periods, number of OKRs etc entirely as you wish. But if you’re changing them every other day what’s the point of having them to track against in the first place?

What I have found to work better is to have some pretty non-negotiable KPIs that are pretty specific but at the same time broad to enable all sorts of paths and journeys leading up to them.

1-2 on a six months basis is enough, I would argue. Especially at a super early stage, where having too many objectives will most likely only result in a lack of focus.

Agree on those and agree on providing a weekly or bi-weekly short status mail where you mention the points, the most important developments since last time, your confidence and actions until next update, and you’re set.

Forget everything else.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

Roadmap as a journey

It is often fairly easy to describe what the ambition of your idea or startup is; where is it that you strive to be in, say, 5 years time? What is the outcome you are looking for? The dent in the universe you are looking to shape?

What is often neglected on a planning level though is the journey to get there. Even if it can actually be a quite simple thing to plot:

Start with the end goal. Ask yourself what needs to be true in terms of results to get there (in a headline format), and then look at what needs to be true or done to get to those results etc. In that way you can essentially reverse engineer your journey, and – voila! – you have a first simple roadmap for what you should be focusing on to get to the ultimate destination.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

3 big goals for 2020

Hello 2020! It’s a new year and with that comes fresh opportunity including the opportunity to set really ambitious goals for the coming 12 monts. So naturally, I have done that on behalf of my work as Head of Studio at inQvation.

In 2020 I want us to co-found at least one startup taking on a really big problem that affects +100M people worldwide.

I want us to develop a project from idea to startup with an experienced entrepreneur-in-residence, where we use our combined strenghts and experience to make a mark. Maybe we could even combine it with the above goal?

And finally, I want us to create “A Path To Success” for great talent within the startup space in Denmark, where inQvation becomes the ‘go to’-place for those looking to unleash their potential to bring great tech solutions to people who have the problems and pains to match.

Ambitious? Yes. Doable? A stretch but if all things align right, why not? Realistic? Not if we don’t try.

(And then of course there are all the other things that comes with being part of a great team that pulls together when needed :-))

(Photo: Pixabay.com)