A bit too Fresh

Some months ago I started subscribing to the Hello Fresh meal-kit service because I was puzzled about the international juggernauts foray into a Danish market that I already found quite saturated.

Fast forward a few months, and I am still subscribing to the service. Yes, it has it’s kinks and minor mistakes here and there, and yes, sometimes deliveries are a bit late. But overall the concept works, and it has made catering for the family meals a slightly less daunting and stressful task.

So while the service as such works, I am not too enthusiastic about the way that Hello Fresh aggressively markets their service;

Buying advertorials in leading tabloids is one thing. No problem there. But doing the same on less reputable marketing blogs with dodgy names and even dodgy’er content is just stupid IMHO.

On short term metrics the approach may work. But by associating themselves with these kinds of methods, they’re exposing their brand – the core of the service – into a less positive light, where people start to get annoyed.

I mean, why in Gods name do I get these ads in my Facebook feed multiple times every single day, when I am already a loyal subscriber?

The only thing these ads make me do is read the comments, where people are complaining about the advertising and relating them to some less than stellar reviews of the service on Trustpilot.

Customers are adding the numbers up, and my bet is that the tactics are keeping more people from subscribing than adding new subscribers to the service.

The trouble for Hello Fresh is that they will most likely not see this ‘dark number’ of potentiel subscribers who decide against the service. And they should. Because that is ALSO a direct result of their marketing efforts.

Therefore, dear Hello Fresh: Please review your marketing strategy and approach and stop giving your own concept and service a bad…ehhm…taste in the mouth.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

5 learnings from HelloFresh

Recently I made a commitment to try different products and services out in order to try and get a better understanding of what it is the best consumer-focused digital companies do that make them so successful.

My starting point was HelloFresh which just recently launched in Denmark.

Monday I got my first shipment from HelloFresh; 3 meals for the week priced at ~130 DKK per meal for 4 people. And these are my first 3 learnings from HelloFresh:

(1) It’s fresh ingredients. I know the point is banal but it needs to be made because it’s important – especially with such a brand name.

(2) HelloFresh operates with a “Zero Waste” promise, and it is easy to see why; everything is sorted for the various means in neat recyclable paper bags, and the measurements of ingredients are exactly what’s needed to cook the meal – no more, no less. When you’re done there’s nothing left – food nor packaging – and thus the promise is kept. Check.

(3) Besides being totally measured most things are clearly branded “HelloFresh” signalling that someone has gone the extra mile in execution of ensuring that things are what they are promised to be and in the quantities needed. It gives a nice touch of care and attention to detail and ensures that both brand and the brand promise is present from start to finish.

(4) With the food NOT being pre-prepped you still get to enjoy the process of cooking even if it’s super easy. It’s quite different from something you just need to heat, and I think being able to add that little extra touch and having some sort of control is super important. Convenience goes a long way but only such a long way. You’re part of the product and process, and in that way it gets under your skin and helps build preference. Pretty clever.

(5) Even though the introduction offer is 30 % of normal price, at 130DKK per meal there is more than enough tangible value in the kit in order to make it attractive. I mean, try to go to the super market and buy groceries for a 4 person meal in Denmark for 130 DKK (or even 170 DKK) with EVERYTHING (except salt, pepper and oil, but you get my point), and you will often come up short. The point: Even if the individual recipe fails or something goes wrong, the value of the offering compared to the alternatives are still there making the offer trending towards a no-brainer to at least try out.

These are just the first few thoughts. I fully realize that it sounds like a glowing endorsement, and maybe it also is. I am just positively surprised by the sheer completeness of the offering in both product, messaging, packaging and everything.

There seems to be no stones left unturned here. Which I guess is the truly inspiring part.

(Photo: Private)

The HelloFresh test

One of the basic common rules for startups is that if what you’re working on is worth doing, you’re bound to have competition (unless you’re operating in one of those rare spaces, where you have spotted something before anyone else, of course).

With so many services – especially in the consumer space – feeling more or less alike or at the very least trying to serve the same need or solve the same problem, you need to ask yourself, what the differentiator between success and failure is going to be.

There are quite a lot to choose from, but one of the ones, I increasingly believe a lot in is the end-to-end Customer Experience, i.e. everything from the smoothness of using the product and get what you need to the overall feel of the entire experience.

If you want to learn from the best – or those believed or rumored to be the best – there is only one way to go about it: To try the service out and see for yourself.

For that reason I have made a personal decision:

I am going to be trying out a different services in quite crowded consumer spaces over the coming months to get a sense of how those that get singled out for their Customer Experience and their ability to execute ruthlessly against it actually work.

I have already signed up for the first one: HelloFresh.

HelloFresh is rumored to be a cutthroat business that are very good at executing flawlessly in the crowded meal kit market.

They have just entered the Danish market, and I have signed up to give it a spin. The Danish meal kit market is super crowded with all sorts of services, and I have previously tried a few without being overly impressed.

So I am very curious to see, if my experience with HelloFresh is going to feel any different – if I can FEEL the execution. And what – if anything – I can learn from it to bring to the other things I am working on.

Because, yes, it always pays to get inspired from other industries for what you’re trying to succeed with yourself.

I will keep you posted on what I learn.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)