Corona thoughts, part 7

When we discuss the future of (remote) work, we should not only discuss the various digital tools that enable this but also the foundation for it all to work: Great, stable connectivity.

At the start of the lockdown, I finally got our household on the new fiber connection, I ordered almost a year ago. Before that we had TV, laptops, iPads and mobile phones on a wobbly 20Mb on/off connection through copper that would have completely crashed with the added stress of fulltime remote work for two people AND home schooling.

In other words: We were lucky to get a bump up connection in time. And I have a sense that access to the right connectivity will be yet another divider of the haves and have nots going forward. Because if your basic infrastructure is not in place and up for the job, no fancy tools are going to make you efficient from a distance.

PS: My now soon-to-be-former provider adviced me to not send their router back but instead ship it to a museum. Funny, although…interesting…that a provider charges premium prices for something they know is antiquated.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

Corona thoughts, part 3

It seems to me that a lot of the people who are starting to advocate economic considerations ahead of health-related ones during this pandemic, are some of the same people who were the least prepared for a sudden halt in economic activity. I don’t blame them for wanting to get back to normal ASAP – we all want that to happen.

However, I still think we need to spend time after this is over on the things, we have learned from this. Maybe we should consider whether some of the business school books should be reviewed and refined. Overly complex supply chains, ‘Just in time’-principles and over-optimization of the daily business operations managing cash on a shoestring suddenly seem like brilliant ideas now than they seemed to be just a month ago, right?

I continue to find it shocking (and then, not really for the above reasons, ed.) that otherwise successful and well-run companies can crumble within a week or two. It seems like a lot of businesses were already in essence on major life support as it were, and if the corona pandemic hadn’t pushed to the very edge of the cliff, it was a matter of time before something else would.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)