Beware changing models

Can you start out with one type of business model and then transition to a new one without facing huge challenges?

The question is a valid one. And the answer is probably “No” in most cases. And it is worth exploring a bit further, as it’s often a topic that comes up when I meet with founders.

The issue with wanting to change the business model is that what I need and want as a founder and business owner is not necessarily the same as my customer needs and wants.

Let me a simple example from my own life as a customer:

When I order a case of wine from my preferred ‘wine pusher’, I expect it to be an interesting wine from a wine maker, I would otherwise never have heard of and at a reasonable price. Like I am used to.

I do not expect to get an offer for a wine they have produced themselves together with a chef, I have never heard of (even though it probably says something bad about me that I don’t). As I got the other day. And immediately decided to decline.

Why?

Because it broke the fundamental ‘contract’ I have with my regular supplier: You find regular wines from little known places that I can then get a good offer on. That’s the model, I have signed up for. You DON’T try to introduce your own brands into the mix, because that deviates from our ‘contract’.

Could I be more forgiving here and just try it out? Absolutely. And I fully expect that many of their customers do so. Otherwise they probably wouldn’t do it. But I think it goes to show how challenging it can be to make changes to your fundamental value proposition and business model.

I think you need to be very aware of this. Because while it may be tempting to try to change your business model to introduce new revenue streams, cut costs, increase sales, boost your bottom line or whatever, you won’t succeed in it if you’re out of sync with what your customers are expecting.

Don’t ever take even your loyal customers for granted.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)