See you at TechBBQ

This Thursday and Friday I am going to the TechBBQ tech conference in Copenhagen.

Am I looking forward to it? You bet, I am. I can’t remember when the last time was I had the opportunity to go to a conference, meet new people and learn interesting things. But it feels like it has been ages.

I think a lot of us are really looking forward to going out among others again in a professional setting after the long Covid-19 isolation. And maybe – just maybe – the lockdown has been a blessing in disguise in the sense that we’re now not taking opportunities to meet in person for granted but are instead looking to get the absolute most out of them.

I certainly intend to. I have a bunch of 1:1 meetings lined up with interesting people, but if you see me there, please feel free to come and say ‘Hi!’.

If you’re unsure of whether it’s me, I will be wearing ‘People’ clothing, so I should be recognizable.

I hope to see you there!

(Photo by Adam Jang on Unsplash)

Commercialization as a science

When you’re working with researchers and/or developers, it can be super easy to completely focus on the research, the science and the product it is all (potentially) leading towards and the inherent value herein. And that nothing else matters to your future success.

But that is a flawed assumption. Cool technology doesn’t cut it on its own. It needs a complete ecosystem around it to have any chance of succeeding.

Developing such an ecosystem is super tough. There are many moving parts that changes all the time. And when you account for the human factor, change of opinions, irrational decision making etc, it becomes extremely complicated very quickly.

Navigating and succeeding in that maze outside the lab is a science in itself. And it should be dealt with, rewarded and appreciated in just the same way as we have the deepest respect for those working behind the scenes to develop the technology.

It takes two to tango. It takes tech and commercial acumen to succeed.

One cannot exceed without the other. And vice versa.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

The FANG virus

Nothing is so bad that it isn’t good for something else.

If you’re an investor in FANG stock – Facebook, Apple, Netflix and Alphabet (Google) – and potentially Microsoft as well, you will probably have one eye on your portfolio, which is doing pretty well and have recovered what was briefly lost.

The other one you will be having on how the FANG companies use the lockdown and the uproar to create new opportunities for themselves and become even more dominant.

Case in point: Facebook is still getting stronger, Amazon is cementing it’s lead in e-commerce and almost anything else with its customers being under lockdown at home. And so on and so on.

And there is reason to be optimistic (if you’re an investor, that is), because what does the FANG companies have that many others don’t at this point?:

Cash. Piles of cash.

In a situation where cash is king, those with an abundance of cash can go on the offense, when everybody else is forced on the defense.

Right now the only thing stopping FANG from using this pandemic to dominate the online space even more – infect, even – than before is regulation.

What are the odds of that happening any time soon?

I thought so.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)