From fad to phenomenon

Personally, I am no big believer in all the talk about the ‘metaverse’; the idea that AR, VR, crypto, NFTs and other good stuff is going to be woven together and present a whole new kind of digital layer to our physical existence.

But I am reasonable enough to agree that when enough big players with big, big muscles are talking about the same thing – or at the very least the same ballpark of a thing – the likelihood of it coming to fruition grows significantly.

Simply by applying brute force, so to say.

The way I see trends, I don’t see them as a force of nature. I see them as entirely man made. They are what happens when enough powerful people agree to move into the same general direction and drag all the rest of us along.

Thus a powerful tool for spotting trends is listening in on what people talk about and what the powerful people with ability and money actually does. What they do doesn’t necessarily have to make a lot of logical sense from a qualitative point-of-view – it’s all about the quantity here.

Does that mean that big trends will work for the better for all of us? Not necessarily. It just means that when there is money to be made from something happening and arguing its a positive thing for the greater good, it will happen. No matter if it is, indeed, good or bad.

That’s basically how you can turn a potential fad into a phenomenon.

(Photo by Richard Horvath on Unsplash)

Cash value of communication

Often times I meet people who question the value of a focused, operational communications strategy. The argument is that there are plenty of other more important jobs to get done before looking coherently at communications.

Allow me as a former communications professional to take a step back and look at the kind of value, great communication can unlock for a startup. I will do so over a couple of posts here, and today I will be looking at one of the really easy ones to measure:

Sales.

Normally, when we think of sales, we think it of it as an effort to get our offer in front of the right people in order for them to make a decision on whether they want to buy our solution or not. The more we work diligently with sales, the better we will be at getting it in front of the right people, the more hot leads will be created, the better conversation rates will be and – ultimately – the more we will sell.

Ok.

So what role does communications play in that? Let’s look at it from a structured operational perspective:

Let’s assume you have your OKRs in place. You know what your objectives for the upcoming quarter(s) are, and you have identified the measurable key results that will support you in understanding what kind of progress you’re making towards reaching those goals.

If we look at sales, the objective could be to launch a new product successfully, and a key result could easily be to get 200 new hot leads and book 50 first sales meetings.

Ok. Where does communication come into play here?

Easy.

When you look at the job of getting 200 new leads, you need to figure out where to find them but – more importantly – WHAT to tell them in order to get them interested, so they become a hot new lead, you can work with.

In order to know what to tell them, you need to have a clearly crafted value proposition and a wording of it that resonates with the intended target audience, so you can optimize your conversion.

That’s all about communication and getting the actual words right.

Furthermore, in order to be on the radar of your future customers, when you try to convert them into hot leads, you need to have created awareness and a presence about your startup, your brand and, most importantly, your product(s). And you need to have done so in a way that is available and convincing in a way that sits well with your future customers.

That’s all about communication, too.

Finally, when you have the sales meetings, you need to ensure that the people you meet get hooked enough to buy. They need to be convinced by those final killer arguments for why your product is the solution to their problem, and doing so in a scalable way requires not only a solid structure but also – again – the most effective words.

Surprise, that’s communication too.

All in all a focus on great end effective communications is a powerful an extremely valuable driver for driving sales. It’s not just a marketing job – and yes, marketing is communications too. And communications is not only about PR and looking good on SoMe.

So do yourself a favor and prioritize your communications efforts in your startup. Doing it right can – almost – be translated to money in the bank.

(Photo by Tadeu Jnr on Unsplash)

Profitable disagreement

I have always found that one of the greatest opportunities to learn something new and valuable is through constructive disagreement.

I find that when there’s disagreement in the air, there is a chance to broaden your own horizon. If you have the ability to breathe deeply, listen in and resist the urge to just shoot back with your own opinions.

I can’t remember a time where I didn’t learn something or at least have a proper reflection, and on the opposite scale I have even had a couple of epiphany moments that made a huge difference to me in my decision making.

Yet, despite of this, I often hear how disagreement lead to people separating and to great team members leaving teams who IMHO really, really need the kind of disagreement, pushback and questions being asked that they are waving goodbye to.

Instead of working out the severance papers these teams and the people involved should be focusing on what they could each learn from each other, and how this new and broader perspective could be brought to bear on the profitable development of the company.

Because there often is a direct correlation between differences of opinion, a respectful learning environment and broadening of ones horizon and the bottom line.

Yes, disagreement can be painful. And of course also sometimes beyond repair. But it also has an immense potential for future profit that’s worth investing some serious peace keeping efforts in.

(Photo by Icons8 Team on Unsplash)