Commercialization as a science

When you’re working with researchers and/or developers, it can be super easy to completely focus on the research, the science and the product it is all (potentially) leading towards and the inherent value herein. And that nothing else matters to your future success.

But that is a flawed assumption. Cool technology doesn’t cut it on its own. It needs a complete ecosystem around it to have any chance of succeeding.

Developing such an ecosystem is super tough. There are many moving parts that changes all the time. And when you account for the human factor, change of opinions, irrational decision making etc, it becomes extremely complicated very quickly.

Navigating and succeeding in that maze outside the lab is a science in itself. And it should be dealt with, rewarded and appreciated in just the same way as we have the deepest respect for those working behind the scenes to develop the technology.

It takes two to tango. It takes tech and commercial acumen to succeed.

One cannot exceed without the other. And vice versa.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

Control the effort

The world is such a complex place with a gazillion moving parts that you cannot ever claim that you have got things under control.

Because how things turn out will per definition be outside of your control and sometimes for the most odd reasons.

This makes your job as the one who has to get things moving, get customers, secure sales and drive the business forward super, super hard.

Much harder than actually building the thing, which is a much more controllable process based on having the necessary skills and experience.

So in the absence of control out there, what can you ‘control’?

The effort.

What you put in.

Quick example: If you know that making one sale happen takes about 10 meetings with different leads, you can totally control that you get those 10 meetings set up, and that you get there on time and pitch the living **** out of it.

Same with partnerships, recruitment and everything else; put the required effort in and your chance for success vastly increases.

But don’t just do a lot of random stuff. Have an approach, a system of some sorts, based on always learning and adapting. Refine your approach. Plan ahead. Think it through – but don’t overthink it.

No matter what people might say having a well thought through plan and approach and spending the time on improving it over time will serve you well.

Combine that with putting in the effort, and you might get where you aspire to go.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)