Don’t fall out of windows

Process

When somebody “accidentally” falls out of a window at a hospital or any ofter building after criticizing the government and their policy, actions – or lack thereof – you could argue that it could be seen as a ‘clever’ way of removing an opposing voice for good.

It is a tactic. A morbid but…eehhm…efficient one.

When suddenly people – in plural – start falling out of windows, and there is a common denominator in their background stories it starts to look more like a strategy than a tactic.

A poor strategy that is. Because it becomes totally evident to even the blind what is really going on. And then you have put yourself in a worse position.

The point?

That even if you’re efficient at the tactical level in your daily job, you are not necessarily by any means a good strategist. Rather the opposite.

Why?

Because you’re so caught up in what’s efficient in the moment, short term, that you completely miss out on the bigger, longer term picture.

And here is a news flash:

It is always the bigger, long term picture that decides how others look at and interact with you and your company.

So if you want to be good at tactics and strategy, bet on being good at strategy first.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

Corona thoughts, part 8

Thoughts

Last night we did a first in my network group under the Danish Management Society (VL): We had our first virtual meeting, and we used it as a venue for getting a situation report from our various industries in the light of the corona epidemic.

It was super interesting and inspiring to hear from the members about how things look from their end. From the airline executive whose planes are on the ground with no timeslot for getting back to flying to the architects, who use the crisis as a recruiting opportunity for new employees they now find much easier to come by than just six weeks ago.

But what was really interesting was what people have learned from it all. From the banal truths about how working remote works over the development of new online offerings in the consulting industry to people worrying about the potential longer-term fallout for society and the world as a whole.

The meeting really reinforced my long held belief that if you’re looking for a radically different perspective on things, look outside your immediate circles. Look across industries, roles and everyday jobs to get that sense of inspiration that gets your own mind going. That’s where you can get a ton of value.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)