Passion versus perspective

When you’re passionate about something, it is very easy to let passion get the better of you and lose the grander perspective on things.

That’s the trouble with passion; it has a capacity to leave you blind-sighted during the very times when you need perspective the most. You focus too much on the here and now rather on what could come next.

But on the other hand passion is also a huge source of energy.

Not only when things go well, and you feel like you can just keep on going because you’re on a quest.

But also when things are falling off the rails, because that’s when you use the energy of your passion to grind your teeth, keep on going and figure out what to do next.

But it still takes an ability to keep your eyes and – most especially – your mind open to the perspective.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

When the going gets…well…

This Christmas I gave one of my colleagues the book “How To Lead A Quest: A guidebook for Pioneering Leaders” by Jason A. Fox to one of my colleagues.

There was a reason why I wanted to gift the – hands down – best business book, I have ever read: Because everything it says is both true and so, so important to hear and know when you’re trying to do something really hard.

And that is exactly the position you’re in, when you’re trying to build a startup or just something new. You’re in a place, where you aspire to great success eventually, but where every day is more likely filled with grueling thoughts about all the different ways, what you’re currently trying to achieve will never happen.

When you’re in that situation it can be so tempting to just give in, give up and close shop. But of course thats not what you should do and not what most aspiring entrepreneurs with more than a childish fascination of being his own boss and one day become super rich do.

Why? Because feeling like shit when you’re trying to create something new and out of the ordinary is normal.

Brutally normal.

The book says so. So it must be – and is – true.

Think of that when you feel the urge to take what seems like the easy but totally shortsighted part.

PS: Again, a huge THANK YOU to the good Anders Toxboe for recommending this amazing book to me in the first place.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)