Fan of fans

Work

Back in 2008 me and my present boss had a great dialogue back and forth about a concept, we called “Fan of Fans”; the idea built in Kevin Kelly’s 1000 True Fans post that if you could muster enough dedicated fans, you would have the foundation for a solid business.

We bought the domain and discussed it at length, but we never followed through on it. I am not the one to say what could or could not have been, had we put in the extra mileage. But what I can say is this:

(1) The whole idea is coming back with a vengeance post Covid-19; we’re done with mindless, senseless, cheap junk. I admit, it is a prediction, but I really believe in it coming true.

(2) The idea is going to be core to a new project, I am working on, and which I very much hope, I will be able to announce very soon (aka within weeks rather than months).

Why? Because fans are important. They matter. More than anything, really.

When you have fans, you have desire, you have something other people want. Otherwise; why would they be fans, exactly? Why do huge arena concerts with big names sell out (in normal times) in minutes after tickets are being put on sale?

With fans you have a source of revenue as those desires have a tendency to be transferable into good ol’ cash. I am a big fan of LEGO. Ask my girlfriend how much LEGO I have and still buy, and how much LEGO Friends my two girls are swimming in?

With fans you have your “Why?”, your purpose. With fans you’re never in doubt as to why you are there – and what is expected of you in terms of performance and behaviour. They’re extremely vocal.

And with fans you have stamina for the long haul. I have been a fan of Blackburn Rovers Football Club for almost 30 years now, and even though we fans have been dragged through the mud, to hell and back again, we’re still there. Because that is what it means being a real fan.

Working with fans can be daunting. But it can also be easy. If you treat them as fans and realize that just as it is in business in general, the fan is always right.

Always.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

Remote humans

Thoughts

Working remotely is getting a lot of additional buzz following the outbreak of corona-virus, as people all over scramble to try to put themselves out of harms way and/or following the advice of local health authorities.

While there is a lot of great things to be said about working remotely – and there are – there are also some downsides of which the predominant one is this: Missing out on the creative sparks that fly when you bring people together, and they start getting creative.

For me, when people (in the absence of a perfectly legitimate health-related excuse, ed) want to work in a predominantly remote way, they send a signal that they care more about their ways of working than what we are working on; what we are trying to solve. Call me old fashioned, but I am the kind of guy who needs to be able to look my team members directly in the eyes to make sure we are all on the same page, driving for the same results – and feel equally passionate about succeeding. As a team.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

Getting into the head

Process

You can have the best idea or the best product out there but still get a resounding ‘No’ from your stakeholders. When that happens it is always hugely frustrating, and it is only naturel to ponder what the heck went wrong.

But instead of guessing try to understand by getting into the decision makers head. Because often, the way that they respond has little to do with your actual idea and the context at hand but a lot to do with the mental model(s) they are operating from.

Sit down, have a good conversation and seek to understand what’s driving their decision. There are even guides for how you can do that. Doing that will give you an edge as preciously few other people bother to try to understand. But if you’re able to, chances are that the next time you will be able to navigate to a ‘Yes’.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

Ongoing learning

Process

It is fairly easy to meet founders who think they know it all. Founders who are so sure of their own success and the trajectory that they are on that they almost excude overconfidence.

But are they overconfident, or are they just pretending out of fear of losing face, credibility, mojo or something else? Probably. Because just under the surface of any founder is the fear of failure. Of making the wrong decision. Of missing the boat completely.

It is natural. And actually fear can be transformed into a strenght, if you use it as an opportunity to have a learning mindset. Studys show that one of the traits of successful founders is the ability to learn. And in order to learn, you need to start by acknowledging that you don’t know it all. So get comfortable with that – and embark on your ongoing learning process.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

Stay nimble when you need to

Process, Testing

One of the easiest things is to get carried away by your great idea. For many aspiring entrepreneurs it just happens straight out of the gate. But even for those who have learned and accepted that getting to product/market-fit is an experimental process, it can be tricky to stay the course and be true to your process.

Staying nimble when you need to is a virtue. With an emphasis on ‘when you need to’. Because of course there comes a time – hopefully – where it makes a ton of sense to just do whatever it takes to hit it out of the park. Chances are though that that won’t be the first thing you need to do. And that doing it anyway may send you seriously off course – sometimes without the ability to recover.

A good way of staying the course could be to have a simple process drawn down. David J. Bland has an excellent one in a video here, where he connects Pirate Metrics for growth with experimentation and how to allocate time and budget. That is exactly what you need to make sure that you stay focused on the right things at the right points of time and that you stay the course and stay nimble, when you need to.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

Remember the vision

Process

Eventhough I am a big proponent of starting small and experimenting your way forward when building a startup or a new product or service for that matter, there is one thing that always needs to be in place: A vision.

It is so easy to get an idea and just start executing small scale. It is harder to succeed in closing the first sale, but it becomes super tricky if that first sale is not supported by a vision of where it is you want to take your new company long term.

With a vision in place, you will know whether your first sale sets you off in the right direction and gives you something to build on. With a vision in place, your chances of making that first sale happen based on criteria and terms that supports your overall goal increases. Without a vision you risk tumbling in the dark. And – more importantly – without a vision you risk building a business that will never really be able to take off but will just (best case) hum along.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

Starting small

Process

Even the best and brightest ideas should start small on the implementation side. Just out of respect for the fact that you could have it terribly wrong. Especially if your opportunity is huge, you need to be mindful that you don’t run the risk of creating a big mess by overreaching from the ‘go’.

Naturally, if you are developing a brand new and hugely innovative service or product, the world has never seen before and thus not know it needs, you will think differently about it. My point is just that those invention cases are the outliers. Most of the time you will be trying to improve on something already out there.

Moving in smaller steps doesn’t kill your opportunity. Because of course you have a flexible roadmap that will adapt as you move along and learn more. And because you learn and show respect you will gain trust of those you are trying to serve. And that trust will serve you well when getting to the point where you start reaping all the good stuff you have sowed.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

3 big goals for 2020

Work

Hello 2020! It’s a new year and with that comes fresh opportunity including the opportunity to set really ambitious goals for the coming 12 monts. So naturally, I have done that on behalf of my work as Head of Studio at inQvation.

In 2020 I want us to co-found at least one startup taking on a really big problem that affects +100M people worldwide.

I want us to develop a project from idea to startup with an experienced entrepreneur-in-residence, where we use our combined strenghts and experience to make a mark. Maybe we could even combine it with the above goal?

And finally, I want us to create “A Path To Success” for great talent within the startup space in Denmark, where inQvation becomes the ‘go to’-place for those looking to unleash their potential to bring great tech solutions to people who have the problems and pains to match.

Ambitious? Yes. Doable? A stretch but if all things align right, why not? Realistic? Not if we don’t try.

(And then of course there are all the other things that comes with being part of a great team that pulls together when needed :-))

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

Lead by experience

Thoughts

Yesterday, the company I chose to deliver fiber to my home made their best effort to loose me as a customer. Due to unfortunate circumstances I narrowly missed a visit by a technician, and when I called them to figure out what went wrong, the customer support was rude and hung up on me.

Companies behaving that way may have a good or even great product. But they have a shitty customer experience. And in a day and age where basically everybody can do anything, the true differentiator between winning and losing as a business with the customer is precisely what happened to me: A shitty customer experience.

Whether you are in a corporate or getting your own startup off the ground you should aim to lead by experience; be the most open, accommodating, empathetic and what have you. Because even if I as a customer come to you with a problem, I will remember you cared – and I will our relationship an extra shot.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)

Aim to get pushed

Process

Recently I met with a good colleague for a coffee to share experiences. One of the things, we discussed, was how to do a handover from a project, you started, to someone else who is going to turn it into a business. It’s an important milestone for what we do at inQvation Studio, and thus getting it right is super critical to us.

I always imagined that the right approach would be to go out and recruit a great team, get the people on board with the project and then basically step back. But after our chat, my mind changed.

Because it is not about stepping back. It is about being pushed out by the new members on the team. Because when they do that they show that they are in charge and you are no longer needed. In summary, the people you are looking for to join the team are those passionate, eager and ambitious enough that they will challenge you – and ultimately drive you towards the door. Because then they will have made it their own. And that is what is needed for success.

(Photo: Pixabay.com)